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Stressed Out? Try Listening to Positive Self-Talk

      

(YorkPedia Editorial):- Pensacola, Aug 19, 2020 (Issuewire.com) – Stressed Out? Try Listening to Positive Self-Talk.

In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, it’s not surprising that people would turn inward to find peace of mind. According to Shad Helmstetter, Ph.D., author of the best-selling book, What to Say When You Talk to Your Self, negative self-talk is something more people are suddenly becoming aware of.

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“Now, during the pandemic, people can feel their self-talk working against them. The wrong self-talk literally wires your brain to create more stress,” Helmstetter says, “and that’s making the pandemic worse for a lot of people.”

To help people learn how to change their self-talk, Helmstetter founded The Self-Talk Institute more than thirty years ago. “The Institute has identified the key steps to changing your self-talk from negative to positive,” Helmstetter says. “Those steps include monitoring your current self-talk, editing and replacing negative self-talk that works against you, and learning to reframe your thoughts each day.”

To help them do that, people listen to daily self-talk audio sessions that are streamed to their cell phones. “People used to listen to self-talk sessions on money and success. Now they’re listening to self-talk on stress and anxiety. It’s a sign of the times,” Helmstetter says.

Tracy Wright, a certified life coach and self-talk trainer, teaches self-talk methods to her clients. “Everyone of my coaching clients is on a daily regimen of listening to positive self-talk,” Wright says. “Learning to change your self-talk is just like learning a new language. The key is repetition. The more you listen to the right self-talk, and practice it, the more natural it becomes.”

“Today, many life-coaches, therapists and counselors, are advising their clients to practice positive self-talk to help keep stress at bay,” Helmstetter says. “No one is immune from stress, but people who practice the right, positive self-talk are giving themselves an advantage.”

Dr. Shad Helmstetter’s latest book is Negative Self-Talk and How to Change It. Self-talk audio sessions are available from the Self-Talk Institute at www.selftalkplus.com.

(YorkPedia Editorial):- Pensacola, Aug 19, 2020 (Issuewire.com) – Stressed Out? Try Listening to Positive Self-Talk.

In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, it’s not surprising that people would turn inward to find peace of mind. According to Shad Helmstetter, Ph.D., author of the best-selling book, What to Say When You Talk to Your Self, negative self-talk is something more people are suddenly becoming aware of.

“Now, during the pandemic, people can feel their self-talk working against them. The wrong self-talk literally wires your brain to create more stress,” Helmstetter says, “and that’s making the pandemic worse for a lot of people.”

To help people learn how to change their self-talk, Helmstetter founded The Self-Talk Institute more than thirty years ago. “The Institute has identified the key steps to changing your self-talk from negative to positive,” Helmstetter says. “Those steps include monitoring your current self-talk, editing and replacing negative self-talk that works against you, and learning to reframe your thoughts each day.”

To help them do that, people listen to daily self-talk audio sessions that are streamed to their cell phones. “People used to listen to self-talk sessions on money and success. Now they’re listening to self-talk on stress and anxiety. It’s a sign of the times,” Helmstetter says.

Tracy Wright, a certified life coach and self-talk trainer, teaches self-talk methods to her clients. “Everyone of my coaching clients is on a daily regimen of listening to positive self-talk,” Wright says. “Learning to change your self-talk is just like learning a new language. The key is repetition. The more you listen to the right self-talk, and practice it, the more natural it becomes.”

“Today, many life-coaches, therapists and counselors, are advising their clients to practice positive self-talk to help keep stress at bay,” Helmstetter says. “No one is immune from stress, but people who practice the right, positive self-talk are giving themselves an advantage.”

Dr. Shad Helmstetter’s latest book is Negative Self-Talk and How to Change It. Self-talk audio sessions are available from the Self-Talk Institute at www.selftalkplus.com.

Media Contact
The Self-Talk Institute
[email protected]
http://www.selftalkplus.com

Source :The Self-Talk Institute

This article was originally published by IssueWire. Read the original article here.


      

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